Severe Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient Coinfected with Leishmania braziliensis and Its Endosymbiotic Virus.

Parmentier, Laurent Philippe Simon; Cusini, Alexia; Müller, Norbert; Zangger, Haroun; Hartley, Mary-Anne; Desponds, Chantal; Castiglioni, Patrik; Dubach, Patrick; Ronet, Catherine; Beverley, Stephen M; Fasel, Nicolas (2016). Severe Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient Coinfected with Leishmania braziliensis and Its Endosymbiotic Virus. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 94(4), pp. 840-843. American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 10.4269/ajtmh.15-0803

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Leishmaniaparasites cause a broad range of disease, with cutaneous afflictions being, by far, the most prevalent. Variations in disease severity and symptomatic spectrum are mostly associated to parasite species. One risk factor for the severity and emergence of leishmaniasis is immunosuppression, usually arising by coinfection of the patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Interestingly, several species ofLeishmaniahave been shown to bear an endogenous cytoplasmic dsRNA virus (LRV) of theTotiviridaefamily, and recently we correlated the presence of LRV1 withinLeishmaniaparasites to an exacerbation murine leishmaniasis and with an elevated frequency of drug treatment failures in humans. This raises the possibility of further exacerbation of leishmaniasis in the presence of both viruses, and here we report a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused byLeishmania braziliensisbearing LRV1 with aggressive pathogenesis in an HIV patient. LRV1 was isolated and partially sequenced from skin and nasal lesions. Genetic identity of both sequences reinforced the assumption that nasal parasites originate from primary skin lesions. Surprisingly, combined antiretroviral therapy did not impact the devolution ofLeishmaniainfection. TheLeishmaniainfection was successfully treated through administration of liposomal amphotericin B.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Parmentier, Laurent Philippe Simon; Cusini, Alexia; Müller, Norbert and Dubach, Patrick

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

0002-9637

Publisher:

American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

Language:

English

Submitter:

Norbert Müller

Date Deposited:

08 Jul 2016 16:36

Last Modified:

24 Mar 2017 09:18

Publisher DOI:

10.4269/ajtmh.15-0803

PubMed ID:

26834198

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.82128

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/82128

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