Higher self-control capacity predicts lower anxiety-impaired cognition during math examinations

Bertrams, Alex; Baumeister, Roy F.; Englert, Chris (2016). Higher self-control capacity predicts lower anxiety-impaired cognition during math examinations. Frontiers in psychology, 7(485), pp. 1-10. Frontiers Research Foundation 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00485

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We assumed that self-control capacity, self-efficacy, and self-esteem would enable students to keep attentional control during tests. Therefore, we hypothesized that the three personality traits would be negatively related to anxiety-impaired cognition during math examinations. Secondary school students (N = 158) completed measures of self-control capacity, self-efficacy, and self-esteem at the beginning of the school year. Five months later, anxiety-impaired cognition during math examinations was assessed. Higher self-control capacity, but neither self-efficacy nor self-esteem, predicted lower anxiety-impaired cognition 5 months later, over and above baseline anxiety-impaired cognition. Moreover, self-control capacity was indirectly related to math grades via anxiety-impaired cognition. The findings suggest that improving self-control capacity may enable students to deal with anxiety-related problems during school tests.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Education > Educational Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Education

UniBE Contributor:

Bertrams, Alexander Gregor and Englert, Christoph

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 370 Education

ISSN:

1664-1078

Publisher:

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Alexander Gregor Bertrams-Pencik

Date Deposited:

12 Jul 2016 09:30

Last Modified:

19 Jul 2018 11:05

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00485

PubMed ID:

27065013

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.82264

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/82264

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