Indigenous fodder trees can increase grazing accessibility for landless and mobile pastoralists in northern Pakistan

Rahim, Inam; Maselli, Daniel; Rueff, Henri; Wiesmann, Urs Martin (2011). Indigenous fodder trees can increase grazing accessibility for landless and mobile pastoralists in northern Pakistan. Pastoralism - research, policy and practice, 1(2) Heidelberg: Springer

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Degraded hillsides in Northern Pakistan are rehabilitated through social forestry campaigns using fast growing exotic trees. These plantations on former scrublands curtail access by livestock owned by landless pastoralists and create social tension. This study proposes an alternative strategy of planting indigenous fodder trees and shrubs that are well-suited to the local socio-ecological characteristics and can benefit all social segments. The choice of fodder tree species, their nutritional value and distribution within the complex socio-ecological system is explained. This study also explores the suitability of these trees at different elevations, sites and transhumant routes. Providing mobile herders with adequate fodder trees could relax social tensions and complement food security.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Integrative Geography > Unit Geography of Sustainable Development
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Integrative Geography
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > NCCR North-South Management Centre (discontinued)
10 Strategic Research Centers > Centre for Development and Environment (CDE)

UniBE Contributor:

Maselli, Daniel; Rueff, Henri and Wiesmann, Urs Martin

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 330 Economics

ISSN:

2041-7136

Publisher:

Springer

Projects:

[433] Landless Pastoralists Research Project

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:24

Last Modified:

23 Nov 2015 11:37

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.8741

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/8741 (FactScience: 214369)

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