Synchrotron microbeam irradiation induces neutrophil infiltration, thrombocyte attachment and selective vascular damage in vivo.

Brönnimann, Daniel; Bouchet, Audrey Michele; Schneider, Christoph; Potez, Marine Therese Charlette; Serduc, Raphaël; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Graber, Werner Adrian; von Gunten, Stephan; Laissue, Jean Albert; Djonov, Valentin (2016). Synchrotron microbeam irradiation induces neutrophil infiltration, thrombocyte attachment and selective vascular damage in vivo. Scientific Reports, 6(33601), p. 33601. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/srep33601

[img]
Preview
Text
von Gunten_Synchrotron microbeam irradiation induces neutrophil infiltration, thrombocyte attachment and selective vascular damage in vivio.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (3MB) | Preview

Our goal was the visualizing the vascular damage and acute inflammatory response to micro- and minibeam irradiation in vivo. Microbeam (MRT) and minibeam radiation therapies (MBRT) are tumor treatment approaches of potential clinical relevance, both consisting of parallel X-ray beams and allowing the delivery of thousands of Grays within tumors. We compared the effects of microbeams (25-100 μm wide) and minibeams (200-800 μm wide) on vasculature, inflammation and surrounding tissue changes during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration in vivo. Microbeam irradiation triggered an acute inflammatory response restricted to the regenerating tissue. Six hours post irradiation (6 hpi), it was infiltrated by neutrophils and fli1a(+) thrombocytes adhered to the cell wall locally in the beam path. The mature tissue was not affected by microbeam irradiation. In contrast, minibeam irradiation efficiently damaged the immature tissue at 6 hpi and damaged both the mature and immature tissue at 48 hpi. We demonstrate that vascular damage, inflammatory processes and cellular toxicity depend on the beam width and the stage of tissue maturation. Minibeam irradiation did not differentiate between mature and immature tissue. In contrast, all irradiation-induced effects of the microbeams were restricted to the rapidly growing immature tissue, indicating that microbeam irradiation could be a promising tumor treatment tool.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology

Graduate School:

Graduate School Gender Studies

UniBE Contributor:

Brönnimann, Daniel; Bouchet, Audrey Michele; Schneider, Christoph; Potez, Marine Therese Charlette; Graber, Werner Adrian; von Gunten, Stephan and Djonov, Valentin

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jana Berger

Date Deposited:

07 Nov 2016 17:14

Last Modified:

15 Jan 2017 02:12

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/srep33601

PubMed ID:

27640676

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.89313

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/89313

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback