MULTIPLE RADIOCARBON DATING OF HUMAN REMAINS: CLARIFYING THE CHRONOLOGY AND SEQUENCES OF BURIALS IN THE LATE NEOLITHIC DOLMEN OF OBERBIPP (SWITZERLAND)

Steuri, Noah; Siebke, Inga; Furtwängler, Anja; Szidat, Sönke; Krause, Johannes; Lösch, Sandra; Hafner, Albert (2019). MULTIPLE RADIOCARBON DATING OF HUMAN REMAINS: CLARIFYING THE CHRONOLOGY AND SEQUENCES OF BURIALS IN THE LATE NEOLITHIC DOLMEN OF OBERBIPP (SWITZERLAND). Radiocarbon, pp. 1-13. Arizona Board of Regents, University of Arizona 10.1017/RDC.2019.96

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Undisturbed megalithic burials are extremely rare because in addition to human activities, natural disturbances due to water influence and erosion or faunal activity are likely to occur over time. The dolmen of Oberbipp discovered in 2011 provides a unique opportunity for multidisciplinary research since anthropogenic and natural disturbances are minor. Morphological Analysis indicates that approximately 42 individuals were buried in the grave chamber. Using archaeological methods alone, it would not have been possible to determine different occupation periods within the inhumations. Neolithic communities often reused dolmen over centuries. Therefore, radiocarbon (14C) dating is the only method that can solve the question of temporal resolution. Fragments of the same bone element (right femora) were analyzed by two (in some cases three) different laboratories to date all inhumations individually. The aim of this study was threefold: (1) to determine the total occupation time of the dolmen (2) to evaluate the sequence of the burials, and (3) to compare the results of the same skeletal element from different laboratories. In total, 79 radiocarbon dating results from three different laboratories of the right femora (n = 32) were obtained. The total time span of the occupation of the dolmen was between 3350 and 2650 BC. The broad application of radiocarbon dating allowed the determination of two occupation periods within the burial.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of Archaeological Sciences > Pre- and Early History
08 Faculty of Science > Departement of Chemistry and Biochemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Anthropology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Steuri, Noah David; Siebke, Inga; Szidat, Sönke; Lösch, Sandra and Hafner, Albert

Subjects:

900 History > 930 History of ancient world (to ca. 499)
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 540 Chemistry
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences & geology
900 History > 940 History of Europe

ISSN:

0033-8222

Publisher:

Arizona Board of Regents, University of Arizona

Funders:

[42] Schweizerischer Nationalfonds

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sandra Lösch

Date Deposited:

29 Aug 2019 12:35

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 09:20

Publisher DOI:

10.1017/RDC.2019.96

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.132752

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/132752

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