Retinal artery occlusion is associated with compositional and functional shifts in the gut microbiome and altered trimethylamine-N-oxide levels.

Zysset-Burri, Denise C.; Keller, Irene; Berger, Lieselotte E.; Neyer, Peter J; Steuer, Christian; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S. (2019). Retinal artery occlusion is associated with compositional and functional shifts in the gut microbiome and altered trimethylamine-N-oxide levels. Scientific reports, 9(1), p. 15303. Springer Nature 10.1038/s41598-019-51698-5

[img]
Preview
Text
s41598-019-51698-5.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (3MB) | Preview

Retinal artery occlusion (RAO) is a sight threatening complication of cardiovascular disease and commonly occurs due to underlying atherosclerosis. As cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis in particular has been associated with compositional alterations in the gut microbiome, we investigated this association in patients with clinically confirmed non-arteritic RAO compared to age- and sex-matched controls. On the phylum level, the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes was decreased in patients with RAO compared to controls, whereas the opposite applied for the phylum of Proteobacteria. Several genera and species such as Actinobacter, Bifidobacterium spp., Bacteroides stercoris, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were relatively enriched in patients with RAO, whereas others such as Odoribacter, Parasutterella or Lachnospiraceae were significantly lower. Patient's gut microbiomes were enriched in genes of the cholesterol metabolism pathway. The gut derived, pro-atherogenic metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) was significantly higher in patients with RAO compared to controls (p = 0.023) and a negative correlation between relative abundances of genera Parasutterella and Lachnospiraceae and TMAO levels and a positive correlation between relative abundance of genus Akkermansia and TMAO levels was found in study subjects. Our findings proposes that RAO is associated with alterations in the gut microbiome and with elevated TMAO levels, suggesting that RAO could be targeted by microbiome-altering interventions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Forschungsbereich Augenklinik > Forschungsgruppe Augenheilkunde
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ophthalmology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR)

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Zysset-Burri, Denise Corinne; Keller, Irene; Berger, Lieselotte Erika; Wolf, Sebastian and Zinkernagel, Martin

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Springer Nature

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sebastian Wolf

Date Deposited:

09 Dec 2019 16:20

Last Modified:

05 Jan 2020 02:42

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41598-019-51698-5

PubMed ID:

31653902

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.135218

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/135218

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback