Emergence of human-adapted Salmonella enterica is linked to the Neolithization process.

Key, Felix M; Posth, Cosimo; Esquivel-Gomez, Luis R; Hübler, Ron; Spyrou, Maria A; Neumann, Gunnar U; Furtwängler, Anja; Sabin, Susanna; Burri, Marta; Wissgott, Antje; Lankapalli, Aditya Kumar; Vågene, Åshild J; Meyer, Matthias; Nagel, Sarah; Tukhbatova, Rezeda; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Chizhevsky, Andrey; Hansen, Svend; Belinsky, Andrey B; Kalmykov, Alexey; ... (2020). Emergence of human-adapted Salmonella enterica is linked to the Neolithization process. Nature ecology & evolution, 4(3), pp. 324-333. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/s41559-020-1106-9

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It has been hypothesized that the Neolithic transition towards an agricultural and pastoralist economy facilitated the emergence of human-adapted pathogens. Here, we recovered eight Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica genomes from human skeletons of transitional foragers, pastoralists and agropastoralists in western Eurasia that were up to 6,500 yr old. Despite the high genetic diversity of S. enterica, all ancient bacterial genomes clustered in a single previously uncharacterized branch that contains S. enterica adapted to multiple mammalian species. All ancient bacterial genomes from prehistoric (agro-)pastoralists fall within a part of this branch that also includes the human-specific S. enterica Paratyphi C, illustrating the evolution of a human pathogen over a period of 5,000 yr. Bacterial genomic comparisons suggest that the earlier ancient strains were not host specific, differed in pathogenic potential and experienced convergent pseudogenization that accompanied their downstream host adaptation. These observations support the concept that the emergence of human-adapted S. enterica is linked to human cultural transformations.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of Archaeological Sciences > Pre- and Early History
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Anthropology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Steuri, Noah; Hafner, Albert; Siebke, Inga Katharina Elisabeth and Lösch, Sandra

Subjects:

900 History > 930 History of ancient world (to ca. 499)
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
900 History > 940 History of Europe
900 History > 950 History of Asia

ISSN:

2397-334X

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Funders:

[42] Schweizerischer Nationalfonds

Language:

English

Submitter:

Sandra Lösch

Date Deposited:

24 Mar 2020 14:56

Last Modified:

24 Mar 2020 16:22

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41559-020-1106-9

PubMed ID:

32094538

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.141475

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/141475

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