Pediatric fever in neutropenia with bacteremia-Pathogen distribution and in vitro antibiotic susceptibility patterns over time in a retrospective single-center cohort study.

Stergiotis, Melina; Ammann, Roland A.; Droz, Sara; Koenig, Christa; Agyeman, Philipp Kwame Abayie (2021). Pediatric fever in neutropenia with bacteremia-Pathogen distribution and in vitro antibiotic susceptibility patterns over time in a retrospective single-center cohort study. PLoS ONE, 16(2), e0246654. Public Library of Science 10.1371/journal.pone.0246654

[img]
Preview
Text
journal.pone.0246654.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (1MB) | Preview

BACKGROUND

Fever in neutropenia (FN) is a potentially life-threatening complication of chemotherapy in pediatric cancer patients. The current standard of care at most institutions is emergency hospitalization and empirical initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy.

METHODS

We analyzed in retrospect FN episodes with bacteremia in pediatric cancer patients in a single center cohort from 1993 to 2012. We assessed the distribution of pathogens, the in vitro antibiotic susceptibility patterns, and their trends over time.

RESULTS

From a total of 703 FN episodes reported, we assessed 134 FN episodes with bacteremia with 195 pathogens isolated in 102 patients. Gram-positive pathogens (124, 64%) were more common than Gram-negative (71, 36%). This proportion did not change over time (p = 0.26). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (64, 32%), viridans group streptococci (42, 22%), Escherichia coli (33, 17%), Klebsiella spp. (10, 5%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (nine, 5%) were the most common pathogens. Comparing the in vitro antibiotic susceptibility patterns, the antimicrobial activity of ceftriaxone plus amikacin (64%; 95%CI: 56%-72%), cefepime (64%; 95%CI 56%-72%), meropenem (64%; 95%CI 56%-72), and piperacillin/tazobactam (62%; 95%CI 54%-70%), respectively, did not differ significantly. The addition of vancomycin to those regimens would have increased significantly in vitro activity to 99% for ceftriaxone plus amikacin, cefepime, meropenem, and 96% for piperacillin/tazobactam (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Over two decades, we detected a relative stable pathogen distribution and found no relevant trend in the antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Different recommended antibiotic regimens showed comparable in vitro antimicrobial activity.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Stergiotis, Melina; Ammann, Roland; Droz, Sara Christine; König, Christa and Agyeman, Philipp Kwame Abayie

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1932-6203

Publisher:

Public Library of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Philipp Agyeman

Date Deposited:

17 Feb 2021 09:13

Last Modified:

21 Feb 2021 03:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1371/journal.pone.0246654

PubMed ID:

33577566

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/152353

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/152353

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback