Oxidative Stress in Bacteria and the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology

Fasnacht, Michel; Polacek, Norbert (2021). Oxidative Stress in Bacteria and the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology. Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, 8 Frontiers 10.3389/fmolb.2021.671037

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Ever since the “great oxidation event,” Earth’s cellular life forms had to cope with the danger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affecting the integrity of biomolecules and hampering cellular metabolism circuits. Consequently, increasing ROS levels in the biosphere represented growing stress levels and thus shaped the evolution of species. Whether the ROS were produced endogenously or exogenously, different systems evolved to remove the ROS and repair the damage they inflicted. If ROS outweigh the cell’s capacity to remove the threat, we speak of oxidative stress. The injuries through oxidative stress in cells are diverse. This article reviews the damage oxidative stress imposes on the different steps of the central dogma of molecular biology in bacteria, focusing in particular on the RNA machines involved in transcription and translation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences (DCBP)

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Fasnacht, Michel and Polacek, Norbert

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 540 Chemistry

ISSN:

2296-889X

Publisher:

Frontiers

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christina Schüpbach

Date Deposited:

03 Jun 2021 14:50

Last Modified:

03 Jun 2021 14:50

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fmolb.2021.671037

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/156265

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/156265

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