Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in healthcare workers from outpatient facilities and retirement or nursing homes in a Swiss canton.

Zürcher, Kathrin; Mugglin, Catrina; Suter-Riniker, Franziska; Keller, Peter M.; Egger, Matthias; Müller, Sandro; Fluri, Michael; Hoffmann, Matthias; Fenner, Lukas (2021). Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in healthcare workers from outpatient facilities and retirement or nursing homes in a Swiss canton. Swiss medical weekly, 151(33-34), w30021. EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag 10.4414/SMW.2021.w30021

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BACKGROUND

Healthcare workers are more frequently exposed to SARS-CoV-2 than the general population. Little is known about healthcare settings outside of hospitals. We studied the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 among healthcare workers in outpatient facilities and retirement or nursing homes in the Canton of Solothurn, Switzerland in the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

METHODS

Longitudinal seroprevalence study among healthcare workers with examinations at baseline and 2 months between June and September 2020. The Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgG and Liaison/Diasorin SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG assay were used to detect antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. All participants provided demographic information. We report descriptive statistics and calculated the seroprevalence with 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS

We included 357 healthcare workers; their median age was 43 years (interquartile range 29-54), and 315 (88.2%) were female. Forty-nine (13.7%) were physicians, 87 (24.4%) practice assistants and 221 (61.9%) nurses. Overall seroprevalence among healthcare workers in outpatient facilities and retirement or nursing homes was 3.4% (12/357). The 12 seropositive healthcare workers were all nurses (12/221, 5.5%); 11 worked at retirement or nursing homes and one at the hospital's outpatient clinic. Symptoms such as loss of smell or taste, shortness of breath, and fever were more prevalent among seropositive healthcare workers than seronegative healthcare workers. No close contact had detectable antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.

CONCLUSIONS

Seroprevalence among healthcare workers was low, but higher among nursing staff of retirement or nursing homes. Healthcare workers at private practices were able to protect themselves well during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Infectiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases > Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Zürcher, Kathrin; Mugglin, Catrina Andrea; Suter, Franziska Marta; Keller, Peter Michael; Egger, Matthias and Fenner, Lukas

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1424-7860

Publisher:

EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Flükiger-Flückiger

Date Deposited:

17 Sep 2021 09:53

Last Modified:

17 Sep 2021 11:07

Publisher DOI:

10.4414/SMW.2021.w30021

PubMed ID:

34495604

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/159350

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/159350

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