Pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis.

Leib, Stephen; Täuber, Martin G. (1999). Pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. Infectious disease clinics of North America, 13(3), pp. 527-548. Elsevier 10.1016/S0891-5520(05)70093-3

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Bacterial meningitis is fatal in 5% to 40% of patients and causes neurologic sequelae in up to 30% of survivors. Much has been learned recently about the mechanisms that lead to brain injury during meningitis. Once bacteria have gained access to the central nervous system, their multiplication triggers a complex host response consisting of humoral and cellular immune mediators, reactive oxygen intermediates, matrix-metalloproteinases, and other host-derived factors. Alterations of the cerebral vasculature, with disruption of the blood brain barrier and global and focal ischemia, ultimately lead to functional and structural brain damage. This article reviews current concepts of the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis and emphasizes possible therapeutic strategies to prevent its harmful consequences.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Review Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases
04 Faculty of Medicine > Other Institutions > Teaching Staff, Faculty of Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Leib, Stephen and Täuber, Martin G.

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0891-5520

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Stephen Leib

Date Deposited:

01 Sep 2014 14:37

Last Modified:

01 Sep 2014 14:37

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/S0891-5520(05)70093-3

PubMed ID:

10470554

Web of Science ID:

000082172400003

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/52774 (FactScience: 60887)

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