PrP-C1 fragment in cattle brains reveals features of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy associated PrP(sc).

Serra, Fabienne Heirangi; Müller, Joachim; Gray, John; Lüthi, Ramona; Dudas, Sandor; Czub, Stefanie; Seuberlich, Torsten (2017). PrP-C1 fragment in cattle brains reveals features of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy associated PrP(sc). Brain research, 1659, pp. 19-28. Elsevier 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.01.015

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Three different types of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are known and supposedly caused by distinct prion strains: the classical (C-) BSE type that was typically found during the BSE epidemic, and two relatively rare atypical BSE types, termed H-BSE and L-BSE. The three BSE types differ in the molecular phenotype of the disease associated prion protein, namely the N-terminally truncated proteinase K (PK) resistant prion protein fragment (PrP(res)). In this study, we report and analyze yet another PrP(res) type (PrP(res-2011)), which was found in severely autolytic brain samples of two cows in the framework of disease surveillance in Switzerland in 2011. Analysis of brain tissues from these animals by PK titration and PK inhibitor assays ruled out the process of autolysis as the cause for the aberrant PrP(res) profile. Immunochemical characterization of the PrP fragments present in the 2011 cases by epitope mapping indicated that PrP(res-2011) corresponds in its primary sequence to the physiologically occurring PrP-C1 fragment. However, high speed centrifugation, sucrose gradient assay and NaPTA precipitation revealed biochemical similarities between PrP(res-2011) and the disease-associated prion protein found in BSE affected cattle in terms of detergent insolubility, PK resistance and PrP aggregation. Although it remains to be established whether PrP(res-2011) is associated with a transmissible disease, our results point out the need of further research on the role the PrP-C1 aggregation and misfolding in health and disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > NeuroCenter
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Serra, Fabienne Heirangi; Müller, Joachim and Seuberlich, Torsten

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

0006-8993

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Fabienne Heirangi Serra

Date Deposited:

28 Jul 2017 13:39

Last Modified:

03 Apr 2018 14:53

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.brainres.2017.01.015

PubMed ID:

28119056

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Atypical; BSE; Cattle; Insoluble PrP; Prion protein

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.97308

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/97308

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