Anodal High-definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over the Posterior Parietal Cortex Modulates Approximate Mental Arithmetic

Hartmann, Matthias; Singer, Sarah; Savic, Branislav; Müri, René M.; Mast, Fred W. (2020). Anodal High-definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over the Posterior Parietal Cortex Modulates Approximate Mental Arithmetic. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 32(5), pp. 862-876. MIT Press Journals 10.1162/jocn_a_01514

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The representation and processing of numerosity is a crucial cognitive capacity. Converging evidence points to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) as primary "number" region. However, the exact role of the left and right PPC for different types of numerical and arithmetic tasks remains controversial. In this study, we used high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) to further investigate the causal involvement of the PPC during approximative, nonsymbolic mental arithmetic. Eighteen healthy participants received three sessions of anodal HD-tDCS at 1-week intervals in counterbalanced order: left PPC, right PPC, and sham stimulation. Results showed an improved performance during online parietal HD-tDCS (vs. sham) for subtraction problems. Specifically, the general tendency to underestimate the results of subtraction problems (i.e., the "operational momentum effect") was reduced during online parietal HD-tDCS. There was no difference between left and right stimulation. This study thus provides new evidence for a causal involvement of the left and right PPC for approximate nonsymbolic arithmetic and advances the promising use of noninvasive brain stimulation in increasing cognitive functions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology, Perception and Methodology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Maalouli-Hartmann, Matthias; Singer, Sarah; Savic, Branislav; Müri, René Martin and Mast, Fred

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 370 Education
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

ISSN:

0898-929X

Publisher:

MIT Press Journals

Funders:

[42] Schweizerischer Nationalfonds

Language:

English

Submitter:

Angela Amira Botros

Date Deposited:

20 Jan 2020 09:32

Last Modified:

02 Apr 2020 01:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1162/jocn_a_01514

PubMed ID:

31851594

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.138035

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/138035

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