Using self and peer video annotations of simulated patient encounters in communication training to facilitate the reflection of communication skills: an implementation study.

Pless, Anina; Hari, Roman; Brem, Beate; Woermann, Ulrich; Schnabel, Kai (2021). Using self and peer video annotations of simulated patient encounters in communication training to facilitate the reflection of communication skills: an implementation study. GMS Journal for Medical Education, 38(3), Doc55. German Medical Science 10.3205/zma001451

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Background: The mandatory communication skills course for fourth-year medical students at the University of Bern Medical School aims to prepare students for challenging communication situations. Students role-play four different scenarios with simulated patients (SPs) and receive feedback from the patient's perspective. The scenarios are video-recorded and uploaded onto the University's virtual learning environment. Students can watch and annotate their own videos and give others access to view them. Project description: Although the course is well liked by students, we identified three areas for improvement: lack of faculty feedback; little active use of the video-recordings;lack of opportunity for students to discuss their experiences with each other. We aimed to address these shortcomings by introducing an additional learning task: students are asked to annotate a section of the video in which they had performed well, and one in which they thought they could have done better, in both their own and a colleague's videos. These video clips and annotations served as the basis of a subsequent two-hour small-group seminar with a physician tutor. The course was evaluated by a mandatory online questionnaire. Results: All 247 students completed the questionnaire. The annotation tool and task were deemed to be comprehensible. Students believed they had learnt more from annotating a peers' video than from their own and most thought being assessed by peers was acceptable. The physician tutors' comments were largely deemed as helpful. The mean mark for the course given by students was 4.6 (median 5) (1=very poor, 6=very good). Conclusion: A communication skills course expanded by video-annotations and group discussions with a physician tutor was shown to be feasible and was well received by students and faculty.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Education and Media Unit (AUM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute for Medical Education > Master of Medical Education (MME)

UniBE Contributor:

Pless, Anina; Hari, Roman; Brem, Beate; Woermann, Ulrich and Schnabel, Kai

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2366-5017

Publisher:

German Medical Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Götschmann-Meile

Date Deposited:

16 Apr 2021 10:43

Last Modified:

16 Apr 2021 11:09

Publisher DOI:

10.3205/zma001451

PubMed ID:

33824891

Uncontrolled Keywords:

annotation communication skills training medical education simulated patients video

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/155821

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/155821

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