Two high-risk clones of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae that cause infections in pets and are present in the environment of a veterinary referral hospital.

Brilhante, Michael; Gobeli Brawand, Stefanie; Endimiani, Andrea; Rohrbach, Helene; Kittl, Sonja; Willi, Barbara; Schuller, Simone; Perreten, Vincent (2021). Two high-risk clones of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae that cause infections in pets and are present in the environment of a veterinary referral hospital. Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy, 76(5), pp. 1140-1149. Oxford University Press 10.1093/jac/dkab028

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OBJECTIVES

Infections with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales (CRE) are an emerging problem in pets and a major threat to public health. We determined the genetic relationships among carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CPKp) strains causing infections in hospitalized pets in a veterinary clinic and those found in the environment.

METHODS

WGS was performed with both the Illumina and Nanopore platforms. Searches of genetic features were performed using several databases and bioinformatics tools, and phylogeny was assessed by whole-genome MLST (wgMLST) using SeqSphere and SNP calling with Snippy.

RESULTS

WGS analysis of the CPKp strains identified all environmental and almost all animal strains as the high-risk clone ST11, with the exception of two strains that belonged to ST307. All CPKp belonged to novel complex types (CTs) and carried a conjugative 63 kb IncL plasmid encoding the carbapenemase gene blaOXA-48, yersiniabactin and other virulence factors. Although all CPKp ST11 strains carried additional similar IncR plasmids harbouring multiple antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), such as the plasmid-mediated blaDHA-1 AmpC gene, some structural variations were observed. The two ST307 strains carried identical 156 kb MDR IncFIB(K) plasmids with several ARGs, including the blaCTX-M-15 ESBL gene. Both wgMLST and cgSNP analysis confirmed that CPKp strains of the same ST were genetically highly related independent of the source of isolation.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrated that the clinical CPKp strains were highly related to those contaminating the clinical environment. These findings confirmed nosocomial spread and highlight veterinary hospitals as a source of CPKp, which may further spread to animals, the environment and humans.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology > Molecular Bacterial Epidemiology and Infectiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Internal Medicine
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Quinta Brilhante, Michael; Gobeli, Stefanie; Endimiani, Andrea; Rohrbach, Helene; Kittl, Sonja; Schuller, Simone and Perreten, Vincent

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0305-7453

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Funders:

Organisations 118 not found.; Organisations 177378 not found.; Organisations 174273 not found.

Language:

English

Submitter:

Vincent Perreten

Date Deposited:

26 Apr 2021 10:01

Last Modified:

26 Apr 2021 10:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/jac/dkab028

PubMed ID:

33615354

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/156009

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/156009

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