Pollen exposure is associated with risk of respiratory symptoms during the first year of life.

Gisler, Amanda; Eeftens, Marloes; de Hoogh, Kees; Vienneau, Danielle; Salem, Yasmin; Yammine, Sophie; Jakob, Julian; Gorlanova, Olga; Decrue, Fabienne; Gehrig, Regula; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp; Fuchs, Oliver; Usemann, Jakob (2022). Pollen exposure is associated with risk of respiratory symptoms during the first year of life. Allergy, 77(12), pp. 3606-3616. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/all.15284

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BACKGROUND

Pollen exposure is associated with respiratory symptoms in children and adults. However, the association of pollen exposure with respiratory symptoms during infancy, a particularly vulnerable period, remains unclear. We examined whether pollen exposure is associated with respiratory symptoms in infants and if maternal atopy, infant's sex or air pollution modify this association.

METHODS

We investigated 14,874 observations from 401 healthy infants of a prospective birth cohort. The association between pollen exposure and respiratory symptoms, assessed in weekly telephone interviews, was evaluated using generalized additive mixed models (GAMM). Effect modification by maternal atopy, infant's sex and air pollution (NO2 , PM2.5 ) was assessed with interaction terms.

RESULTS

Per infant 37±2 (mean±SD) respiratory symptom scores were assessed during the analysis period (January through September). Pollen exposure was associated with increased respiratory symptoms during the daytime (RR [95% CI] per 10% pollen/m3 : combined 1.006 [1.002, 1.009]; tree 1.005 [1.002, 1.008]; grass 1.009 [1.000, 1.23]) and nighttime (combined 1.003 [0.999, 1.007]; tree 1.003 [0.999, 1.007]; grass 1.014 [1.004, 1.024]). While there was no effect modification by maternal atopy and infant's sex, a complex crossover interaction between combined pollen and PM2.5 was found (p-Value 0.002).

CONCLUSION

Even as early as during the first year of life, pollen exposure was associated with an increased risk of respiratory symptoms, independent of maternal atopy and infant's sex. Because infancy is a particularly vulnerable period for lung development, the identified adverse effect of pollen exposure may be relevant for the evolvement of chronic childhood asthma.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Paediatric Pneumology

UniBE Contributor:

Salem, Yasmin, Yammine, Sophie, Jakob, Julian, Frey, Urs Peter, Latzin, Philipp, Fuchs, Oliver, Usemann, Jakob

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

0105-4538

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation ; [204] Swiss Lung Association = Lungenliga Schweiz

Language:

English

Submitter:

Anette van Dorland

Date Deposited:

21 Mar 2022 09:37

Last Modified:

15 Dec 2022 13:39

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/all.15284

PubMed ID:

35302662

Uncontrolled Keywords:

aeroallergen cohort study infancy interaction longitudinal study

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/167644

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/167644

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