The maternal microbiota drives early postnatal innate immune development

Gomez de Agüero Tamargo, Maria de la Mercedes; Ganal-Vonarburg, Stephanie C; Fuhrer, Tobias; Rupp, Sandra Carina; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Li, Hai; Steinert, Anna; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried Hektor; Sauer, Uwe; McCoy, Kathleen; Macpherson, Andrew (2016). The maternal microbiota drives early postnatal innate immune development. Science, 351(6279), pp. 1296-1302. American Association for the Advancement of Science 10.1126/science.aad2571

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Postnatal colonization of the body with microbes is assumed to be the main stimulus to postnatal immune development. By transiently colonizing pregnant female mice, we show that the maternal microbiota shapes the immune system of the offspring. Gestational colonization increases intestinal group 3 innate lymphoid cells and F4/80(+)CD11c(+) mononuclear cells in the pups. Maternal colonization reprograms intestinal transcriptional profiles of the offspring, including increased expression of genes encoding epithelial antibacterial peptides and metabolism of microbial molecules. Some of these effects are dependent on maternal antibodies that potentially retain microbial molecules and transmit them to the offspring during pregnancy and in milk. Pups born to mothers transiently colonized in pregnancy are better able to avoid inflammatory responses to microbial molecules and penetration of intestinal microbes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases > Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Gomez de Agüero Tamargo, Maria de la Mercedes; Ganal-Vonarburg, Stephanie; Rupp, Sandra Carina; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Li, Hai; Steinert, Anna; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried Hektor; McCoy, Kathleen and Macpherson, Andrew

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

0036-8075

Publisher:

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Siegfried Hektor Hapfelmeier-Balmer

Date Deposited:

06 Jan 2017 16:09

Last Modified:

06 Jan 2017 16:09

Publisher DOI:

10.1126/science.aad2571

PubMed ID:

26989247

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.82592

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/82592

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