Population Statistics Approach for Safety Assessment in Robotic Cochlear Implantation.

Williamson, Tom; Gerber, Kate; Gerber, Nicolas; Weder, Stefan; Anschuetz, Lukas; Wagner, Franca; Weisstanner, Christian; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco; Weber, Stefan (2017). Population Statistics Approach for Safety Assessment in Robotic Cochlear Implantation. Otology & neurotology, 38(5), pp. 759-764. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/MAO.0000000000001357

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HYPOTHESIS Descriptive statistics with respect to patient anatomy and image guidance accuracy can be used to assess the effectiveness of any system for minimally invasive cochlear implantation, on both an individual patient and wider population level. BACKGROUND Minimally invasive cochlear implantation involves the drilling of a tunnel from the surface of the mastoid to cochlea, with the trajectory passing through the facial recess. The facial recess anatomy constrains the drilling path and places prohibitive accuracy requirements on the used system. Existing single thresholds are insufficient for assessing the effectiveness of these systems. METHODS A statistical model of the anatomical situation encountered during minimally invasive drilling of the mastoid for cochlear implantation was developed. A literature review was performed to determine the statistical distribution of facial recess width; these values were confirmed through facial recess measurements on computed tomography (CT) data. Based on the accuracy of a robotic system developed by the authors, the effect of variation of system accuracy, precision, and tunnel diameter examined with respect to the potential treatable portion of the population. RESULTS A facial recess diameter of 2.54 ± 0.51 mm (n = 74) was determined from a review of existing literature; subsequent measurements on CT data revealed a facial recess diameter of 2.54 ± 0.5 mm (n = 23). The developed model demonstrated the effects of varying accuracy on the treatable portion of the population. CONCLUSIONS The presented model allows the assessment of the applicability of a system on a wider population scale beyond examining only the system's ability to reach an arbitrary threshold accuracy.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Image Guided Therapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders (ENT)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology
10 Strategic Research Centers > ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research > ARTORG Center - Image Guided Therapy > ARTORG Center - Artificial Hearing Research

UniBE Contributor:

Williamson, Tom; Gerber, Kate; Gerber, Nicolas; Weder, Stefan; Wagner, Franca; Weisstanner, Christian; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco and Weber, Stefan

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1531-7129

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lars Marius Schwalbe

Date Deposited:

08 Jun 2017 11:04

Last Modified:

01 Jul 2018 02:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/MAO.0000000000001357

PubMed ID:

28196000

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.95899

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/95899

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