Low Autophagy (ATG) Gene Expression Is Associated with an Immature AML Blast Cell Phenotype and Can Be Restored during AML Differentiation Therapy

Jin, Jing; Britschgi, Adrian; Schläfli, Anna M.; Humbert, Magali; Shan-Krauer, Deborah; Batliner, Jasmin; Federzoni, Elena A.; Ernst, Marion; Torbett, Bruce E.; Yousefi, Shida; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Tschan, Mario (2018). Low Autophagy (ATG) Gene Expression Is Associated with an Immature AML Blast Cell Phenotype and Can Be Restored during AML Differentiation Therapy. Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity, 2018, p. 1482795. Hindawi 10.1155/2018/1482795

[img]
Preview
Text
1482795.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (3MB) | Preview

Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that ensures a dynamic recycling of a variety of building blocks required for self-renewal, homeostasis, and cell survival under stress. We used primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples and human AML cell lines to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy and its role in AML differentiation. We found a significantly lower expression of key autophagy- (ATG-) related genes in primary AML as compared to healthy granulocytes, an increased autophagic activity during all-trans retinoic acid- (ATRA-) induced neutrophil differentiation, and an impaired AML differentiation upon inhibition of ATG3, ATG4D, and ATG5. Supporting the notion of noncanonical autophagy, we found that ATRA-induced autophagy was Beclin1-independent compared to starvation- or arsenic trioxide- (ATO-) induced autophagy. Furthermore, we identified PU.1 as positive transcriptional regulator of ATG3, ATG4D, and ATG5. Low PU.1 expression in AML may account for low ATG gene expression in this disease. Low expression of the autophagy initiator ULK1 in AML can partially be attributed to high expression of the ULK1-targeting microRNA-106a. Our data clearly suggest that granulocytic AML differentiation relies on noncanonical autophagy pathways and that restoring autophagic activity might be beneficial in differentiation therapies.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Pathology > Tumour Pathology

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Humbert, Magali; Krauer, Deborah; Yousefi, Shida; Simon, Hans-Uwe and Tschan, Mario

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1942-0994

Publisher:

Hindawi

Language:

English

Submitter:

Mario Tschan

Date Deposited:

30 Apr 2018 12:59

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 14:08

Publisher DOI:

10.1155/2018/1482795

PubMed ID:

29743969

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.116207

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/116207

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback